Help us explain the human cost of nuclear weapons

The most graphic and terrifying arguments against nuclear weapons can be summed up in two words: Hiroshima and Nagasaki. But today those words are used less often – nuclear weapons tend to be spoken about in terms of their cost and 'deterrent' value. Their real purpose is glossed over.

This autumn we'd like to try and change that by increasing understanding of the human cost of the bomb. We need to raise £15,000. Please help with a donation of if you can.

The picture on the left was painted by Miyaji Tomiko, who was 34 when the atomic bomb hit Hiroshima. It shows her begging for forgiveness from a stranger she was unable to save.

Every day the events of 6th & 9th August move further into the past, and the awful suffering that was caused drifts deeper into memory. But the dangers of nuclear weapons have not receded – quite the reverse. Today there are more countries with this appalling technology than there ever have been, and each weapon is many times more powerful than the bombs which were used in 1945.

At CND we work constantly to make sure this terrible danger is not forgotten, but we need to do more. Earlier this year we launched an animated website (www.cnduk.org/scraptrident) which explains the huge cost of British nuclear weapons, and gives some examples of what else that money could be spent on. The site has had a fantastic response. In just 4 months over 11,000 people have visited it and more than 2,000 of them have opted in to receive our emails – that's another 2,000 people to write to their MPs, attend demos, hand out leaflets and speak to their friends about the need to scrap Trident.

With more publicity the site could have been even more successful – reaching many more people. We've found a way of explaining the issues that works, and we'd like to do more of it, but on a bigger scale. We want to develop a similar site that concentrates on the human and environmental cost of nuclear weapons – that's why they're dangerous after all; because they kill on a huge scale, and carry on killing long after the first blast.

The most graphic and terrifying arguments against nuclear weapons can be summed up in two words: Hiroshima and Nagasaki. But today those words are used less often – nuclear weapons tend to be spoken about in terms of their cost and 'deterrent' value. Their real purpose is glossed over.

This autumn we'd like to try and change that by increasing understanding of the human cost of the bomb. We need to raise £15,000. Please help with a donation of if you can.

The picture on the left was painted by Miyaji Tomiko, who was 34 when the atomic bomb hit Hiroshima. It shows her begging for forgiveness from a stranger she was unable to save.

Every day the events of 6th & 9th August move further into the past, and the awful suffering that was caused drifts deeper into memory. But the dangers of nuclear weapons have not receded – quite the reverse. Today there are more countries with this appalling technology than there ever have been, and each weapon is many times more powerful than the bombs which were used in 1945.

At CND we work constantly to make sure this terrible danger is not forgotten, but we need to do more. Earlier this year we launched an animated website (www.cnduk.org/scraptrident) which explains the huge cost of British nuclear weapons, and gives some examples of what else that money could be spent on. The site has had a fantastic response. In just 4 months over 11,000 people have visited it and more than 2,000 of them have opted in to receive our emails – that's another 2,000 people to write to their MPs, attend demos, hand out leaflets and speak to their friends about the need to scrap Trident.

With more publicity the site could have been even more successful – reaching many more people. We've found a way of explaining the issues that works, and we'd like to do more of it, but on a bigger scale. We want to develop a similar site that concentrates on the human and environmental cost of nuclear weapons – that's why they're dangerous after all; because they kill on a huge scale, and carry on killing long after the first blast.